Rainbow Star


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About

Though mystery shrouds Rainbow’s arrival to earth, it is certain the return had something to do with the Great Pyramids of Giza. A performer since birth, Rainbow has expressed her dreamy worldview through every medium imaginable. Fairy muses interrupted the children’s book she was writing to bestow “Music From the ...

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Publicist
Ben Michaels
812-339-1195 X 204

Current News

  • 08/23/201811/23/2018
  • Lexington, KY

A Palace in the Woods: Rainbow Star Honors Home, Imagination and Mortality, One Wistful Folk-Inspired Song at a Time

One day, Kentucky-based singer-songwriter Rainbow Star picked up a dulcimer and invented her own approach to the instrument--while reinventing herself. “It’s a simple instrument, a diatonic instrument,” Rainbow notes. “But I found a way to make it my own.”

Her  Music From The Rainbow Sparkle Palace: Volume I (release: August 17, 2018) is lovingly handcrafted, hewn from everyday life and universal resonances. From mortality to beloved felines, from...

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News

11/23/2018, Lexington, KY, Al's Bar
08/23/201811/23/2018, A Palace in the Woods: Rainbow Star Honors Home, Imagination and Mortality, One Wistful Folk-Inspired Song at a Time
Event
11/23/2018
Event
11/23/2018
Ticket Phone
(859) 309-2901
Venue Zip
40508
Venue City, State
Lexington, KY
Venue St. Address
601 N Limestone
Venue
Al's Bar
Her Music From The Rainbow Sparkle Palace: Volume I (release: August 17, 2018) is lovingly handcrafted, hewn from everyday life and universal resonances. MORE» More»

One day, Kentucky-based singer-songwriter Rainbow Star picked up a dulcimer and invented her own approach to the instrument--while reinventing herself. “It’s a simple instrument, a diatonic instrument,” Rainbow notes. “But I found a way to make it my own.”

Her  Music From The Rainbow Sparkle Palace: Volume I (release: August 17, 2018) is lovingly handcrafted, hewn from everyday life and universal resonances. From mortality to beloved felines, from Ancient Egypt to love’s trials, Rainbow bridges the sublime and quotidien with a storytelling knack that seems to linger in the hills she calls home.

Rainbow had always loved music, had always adored telling stories and writing poems. An autodidact, she recorded a demo record as a teen, before feeling called to create more visual art and do more creative writing. Complex life events led her back to a hollow not far from her childhood stomping grounds. As Rainbow made her new home, a 96 square foot tiny house she decorated with bold colors and glittering floors, she found herself writing song after song. They echo the gentle exuberance, the quiet confidence Rainbow found there.

The dulcimer inspired a new approach to songwriting for Rainbow. “A friend asked if I had ever played one, and when I said no, she immediately taught me to play ‘Boil Them Cabbage,’ and lent me the dulcimer off her lap.”

Rainbow developed her own playing method for nine months, composing songs while learning traditional tunes from songbooks, even creating the first-ever dulcimer cover of Taylor Swift’s “Trouble.” “The dulcimer is an extraordinarily quiet instrument because it was invented by women who were taught to be seen and not heard,” reflects Rainbow. The flicker of strings provides the perfect counterpoint to Rainbow’s ethereal voice, bringing a hint of mystery to songs like “Ophiuchus” and “Aquarius.”

To deepen her knowledge of the instrument, she turned to fellow Berean and Appalachian folk singer-songwriter Sam Gleaves for dulcimer lessons. She came to know the music of the late Jean Ritchie, a dulcimer player and folk legend based just a few miles from The Palace, whose music inspired “No Shoes.”

Rainbow’s arrangements and original songs feel deeply rooted in the hills and valleys of Kentucky, like the delicate yet powerful “Amazing Grace.” Some feel intimately connected to the beauty of the birds, the woods, the plants and flowers, like “Little Bird,” reminiscent of the otherworldly sweetness of Vashti Bunyan. And some chronicle the joys of the community she loves deeply. “I’ve lived in Europe. I’ve traveled plenty,” she reflects. “But there’s no place like home.”

A long-standing but unsung cornerstone of the Other South, the creative, progressive and uproarious one, Berea has harbored some of America’s best artists, musicians and craftspeople. This community united to support Rainbow’s efforts as she took her first collection of songs to the studio. A friend lent their geodesic dome-shaped home on Pine Valley Drive, where Rainbow grew up, as an impromptu recording studio. Pine Valley Drive is the street her father named, and is paid homage to on the record. A childhood neighbor came by with homemade goodies to share. And a crowd of friends came to back Rainbow on the chorus of “Berea,” the first single from the album.

Rainbow’s gift is conveying the moment with keen immediacy, that sense of place and presence of mind. “Most of my songs exist because I have the most gracious muses in the world,” Rainbow smiles. “About everytime I pick up an instrument, a song falls from the sky, and it feels like my duty to catch it and share it with the world.”

 

Event
11/23/2018

09/21/2018, Fort Thomas, KY, Northern Kentucky University
09/14/201809/21/2018, A Palace in the Woods: Rainbow Star Honors Home, Imagination and Mortality, One Wistful Folk-Inspired Song at a Time
Event
09/21/2018
Event
09/21/2018
Event Notes
Free All Ages
Ticket Price(s)
Free
Venue Zip
41075
Venue City, State
Fort Thomas, KY
Venue St. Address
90 Alexandria Pike
Venue
Northern Kentucky University
Her Music From The Rainbow Sparkle Palace: Volume I (release: August 17, 2018) is lovingly handcrafted, hewn from everyday life and universal resonances. MORE» More»

One day, Kentucky-based singer-songwriter Rainbow Star picked up a dulcimer and invented her own approach to the instrument--while reinventing herself. “It’s a simple instrument, a diatonic instrument,” Rainbow notes. “But I found a way to make it my own.”

Her  Music From The Rainbow Sparkle Palace: Volume I (release: August 17, 2018) is lovingly handcrafted, hewn from everyday life and universal resonances. From mortality to beloved felines, from Ancient Egypt to love’s trials, Rainbow bridges the sublime and quotidien with a storytelling knack that seems to linger in the hills she calls home.

Rainbow had always loved music, had always adored telling stories and writing poems. An autodidact, she recorded a demo record as a teen, before feeling called to create more visual art and do more creative writing. Complex life events led her back to a hollow not far from her childhood stomping grounds. As Rainbow made her new home, a 96 square foot tiny house she decorated with bold colors and glittering floors, she found herself writing song after song. They echo the gentle exuberance, the quiet confidence Rainbow found there.

The dulcimer inspired a new approach to songwriting for Rainbow. “A friend asked if I had ever played one, and when I said no, she immediately taught me to play ‘Boil Them Cabbage,’ and lent me the dulcimer off her lap.”

Rainbow developed her own playing method for nine months, composing songs while learning traditional tunes from songbooks, even creating the first-ever dulcimer cover of Taylor Swift’s “Trouble.” “The dulcimer is an extraordinarily quiet instrument because it was invented by women who were taught to be seen and not heard,” reflects Rainbow. The flicker of strings provides the perfect counterpoint to Rainbow’s ethereal voice, bringing a hint of mystery to songs like “Ophiuchus” and “Aquarius.”

To deepen her knowledge of the instrument, she turned to fellow Berean and Appalachian folk singer-songwriter Sam Gleaves for dulcimer lessons. She came to know the music of the late Jean Ritchie, a dulcimer player and folk legend based just a few miles from The Palace, whose music inspired “No Shoes.”

Rainbow’s arrangements and original songs feel deeply rooted in the hills and valleys of Kentucky, like the delicate yet powerful “Amazing Grace.” Some feel intimately connected to the beauty of the birds, the woods, the plants and flowers, like “Little Bird,” reminiscent of the otherworldly sweetness of Vashti Bunyan. And some chronicle the joys of the community she loves deeply. “I’ve lived in Europe. I’ve traveled plenty,” she reflects. “But there’s no place like home.”

A long-standing but unsung cornerstone of the Other South, the creative, progressive and uproarious one, Berea has harbored some of America’s best artists, musicians and craftspeople. This community united to support Rainbow’s efforts as she took her first collection of songs to the studio. A friend lent their geodesic dome-shaped home on Pine Valley Drive, where Rainbow grew up, as an impromptu recording studio. Pine Valley Drive is the street her father named, and is paid homage to on the record. A childhood neighbor came by with homemade goodies to share. And a crowd of friends came to back Rainbow on the chorus of “Berea,” the first single from the album.

Rainbow’s gift is conveying the moment with keen immediacy, that sense of place and presence of mind. “Most of my songs exist because I have the most gracious muses in the world,” Rainbow smiles. “About everytime I pick up an instrument, a song falls from the sky, and it feels like my duty to catch it and share it with the world.”

 

Event
09/21/2018

09/14/2018, Lexington, KY, 93.9 FM WLXU, El Pulso / Lexington Community Radio, 12 PM
09/11/201809/14/2018, A Palace in the Woods: Rainbow Star Honors Home, Imagination and Mortality, One Wistful Folk-Inspired Song at a Time
Event
09/14/2018
Event
09/14/2018
Venue
93.9 FM WLXU, El Pulso / Lexington Community Radio
Concert Start Time
12 PM
Her Music From The Rainbow Sparkle Palace: Volume I (release: August 17, 2018) is lovingly handcrafted, hewn from everyday life and universal resonances. MORE» More»

One day, Kentucky-based singer-songwriter Rainbow Star picked up a dulcimer and invented her own approach to the instrument--while reinventing herself. “It’s a simple instrument, a diatonic instrument,” Rainbow notes. “But I found a way to make it my own.”

Her  Music From The Rainbow Sparkle Palace: Volume I (release: August 17, 2018) is lovingly handcrafted, hewn from everyday life and universal resonances. From mortality to beloved felines, from Ancient Egypt to love’s trials, Rainbow bridges the sublime and quotidien with a storytelling knack that seems to linger in the hills she calls home.

Rainbow had always loved music, had always adored telling stories and writing poems. An autodidact, she recorded a demo record as a teen, before feeling called to create more visual art and do more creative writing. Complex life events led her back to a hollow not far from her childhood stomping grounds. As Rainbow made her new home, a 96 square foot tiny house she decorated with bold colors and glittering floors, she found herself writing song after song. They echo the gentle exuberance, the quiet confidence Rainbow found there.

The dulcimer inspired a new approach to songwriting for Rainbow. “A friend asked if I had ever played one, and when I said no, she immediately taught me to play ‘Boil Them Cabbage,’ and lent me the dulcimer off her lap.”

Rainbow developed her own playing method for nine months, composing songs while learning traditional tunes from songbooks, even creating the first-ever dulcimer cover of Taylor Swift’s “Trouble.” “The dulcimer is an extraordinarily quiet instrument because it was invented by women who were taught to be seen and not heard,” reflects Rainbow. The flicker of strings provides the perfect counterpoint to Rainbow’s ethereal voice, bringing a hint of mystery to songs like “Ophiuchus” and “Aquarius.”

To deepen her knowledge of the instrument, she turned to fellow Berean and Appalachian folk singer-songwriter Sam Gleaves for dulcimer lessons. She came to know the music of the late Jean Ritchie, a dulcimer player and folk legend based just a few miles from The Palace, whose music inspired “No Shoes.”

Rainbow’s arrangements and original songs feel deeply rooted in the hills and valleys of Kentucky, like the delicate yet powerful “Amazing Grace.” Some feel intimately connected to the beauty of the birds, the woods, the plants and flowers, like “Little Bird,” reminiscent of the otherworldly sweetness of Vashti Bunyan. And some chronicle the joys of the community she loves deeply. “I’ve lived in Europe. I’ve traveled plenty,” she reflects. “But there’s no place like home.”

A long-standing but unsung cornerstone of the Other South, the creative, progressive and uproarious one, Berea has harbored some of America’s best artists, musicians and craftspeople. This community united to support Rainbow’s efforts as she took her first collection of songs to the studio. A friend lent their geodesic dome-shaped home on Pine Valley Drive, where Rainbow grew up, as an impromptu recording studio. Pine Valley Drive is the street her father named, and is paid homage to on the record. A childhood neighbor came by with homemade goodies to share. And a crowd of friends came to back Rainbow on the chorus of “Berea,” the first single from the album.

Rainbow’s gift is conveying the moment with keen immediacy, that sense of place and presence of mind. “Most of my songs exist because I have the most gracious muses in the world,” Rainbow smiles. “About everytime I pick up an instrument, a song falls from the sky, and it feels like my duty to catch it and share it with the world.”

 

Event
09/14/2018

09/13/2018, Lexington, KY, Lexington Community Radio, , 5-6 p on 93.9FM
09/11/201809/13/2018, A Palace in the Woods: Rainbow Star Honors Home, Imagination and Mortality, One Wistful Folk-Inspired Song at a Time
Event
09/13/2018
Event
09/13/2018
Venue
Lexington Community Radio,
Concert Start Time
5-6 p on 93.9FM
Her Music From The Rainbow Sparkle Palace: Volume I (release: August 17, 2018) is lovingly handcrafted, hewn from everyday life and universal resonances. MORE» More»

One day, Kentucky-based singer-songwriter Rainbow Star picked up a dulcimer and invented her own approach to the instrument--while reinventing herself. “It’s a simple instrument, a diatonic instrument,” Rainbow notes. “But I found a way to make it my own.”

Her  Music From The Rainbow Sparkle Palace: Volume I (release: August 17, 2018) is lovingly handcrafted, hewn from everyday life and universal resonances. From mortality to beloved felines, from Ancient Egypt to love’s trials, Rainbow bridges the sublime and quotidien with a storytelling knack that seems to linger in the hills she calls home.

Rainbow had always loved music, had always adored telling stories and writing poems. An autodidact, she recorded a demo record as a teen, before feeling called to create more visual art and do more creative writing. Complex life events led her back to a hollow not far from her childhood stomping grounds. As Rainbow made her new home, a 96 square foot tiny house she decorated with bold colors and glittering floors, she found herself writing song after song. They echo the gentle exuberance, the quiet confidence Rainbow found there.

The dulcimer inspired a new approach to songwriting for Rainbow. “A friend asked if I had ever played one, and when I said no, she immediately taught me to play ‘Boil Them Cabbage,’ and lent me the dulcimer off her lap.”

Rainbow developed her own playing method for nine months, composing songs while learning traditional tunes from songbooks, even creating the first-ever dulcimer cover of Taylor Swift’s “Trouble.” “The dulcimer is an extraordinarily quiet instrument because it was invented by women who were taught to be seen and not heard,” reflects Rainbow. The flicker of strings provides the perfect counterpoint to Rainbow’s ethereal voice, bringing a hint of mystery to songs like “Ophiuchus” and “Aquarius.”

To deepen her knowledge of the instrument, she turned to fellow Berean and Appalachian folk singer-songwriter Sam Gleaves for dulcimer lessons. She came to know the music of the late Jean Ritchie, a dulcimer player and folk legend based just a few miles from The Palace, whose music inspired “No Shoes.”

Rainbow’s arrangements and original songs feel deeply rooted in the hills and valleys of Kentucky, like the delicate yet powerful “Amazing Grace.” Some feel intimately connected to the beauty of the birds, the woods, the plants and flowers, like “Little Bird,” reminiscent of the otherworldly sweetness of Vashti Bunyan. And some chronicle the joys of the community she loves deeply. “I’ve lived in Europe. I’ve traveled plenty,” she reflects. “But there’s no place like home.”

A long-standing but unsung cornerstone of the Other South, the creative, progressive and uproarious one, Berea has harbored some of America’s best artists, musicians and craftspeople. This community united to support Rainbow’s efforts as she took her first collection of songs to the studio. A friend lent their geodesic dome-shaped home on Pine Valley Drive, where Rainbow grew up, as an impromptu recording studio. Pine Valley Drive is the street her father named, and is paid homage to on the record. A childhood neighbor came by with homemade goodies to share. And a crowd of friends came to back Rainbow on the chorus of “Berea,” the first single from the album.

Rainbow’s gift is conveying the moment with keen immediacy, that sense of place and presence of mind. “Most of my songs exist because I have the most gracious muses in the world,” Rainbow smiles. “About everytime I pick up an instrument, a song falls from the sky, and it feels like my duty to catch it and share it with the world.”

 

Event
09/13/2018

08/17/2018, Berea, KY, Berea Friends Meeting House, 7:00 PM
08/03/201808/17/2018, A Palace in the Woods: Rainbow Star Honors Home, Imagination and Mortality, One Wistful Folk-Inspired Song at a Time
Event
08/17/2018
Event
08/17/2018
Ticket Phone
859-334-0406
Venue Zip
40403
Venue City, State
Berea, Kentucky
Venue St. Address
300 Harrison Rd
Venue
Berea Friends Meeting House
Concert Start Time
7:00 PM
Her Music From The Rainbow Sparkle Palace: Volume I (release: August 17, 2018) is lovingly handcrafted, hewn from everyday life and universal resonances. MORE» More»

One day, Kentucky-based singer-songwriter Rainbow Star picked up a dulcimer and invented her own approach to the instrument--while reinventing herself. “It’s a simple instrument, a diatonic instrument,” Rainbow notes. “But I found a way to make it my own.”

Her  Music From The Rainbow Sparkle Palace: Volume I (release: August 17, 2018) is lovingly handcrafted, hewn from everyday life and universal resonances. From mortality to beloved felines, from Ancient Egypt to love’s trials, Rainbow bridges the sublime and quotidien with a storytelling knack that seems to linger in the hills she calls home.

Rainbow had always loved music, had always adored telling stories and writing poems. An autodidact, she recorded a demo record as a teen, before feeling called to create more visual art and do more creative writing. Complex life events led her back to a hollow not far from her childhood stomping grounds. As Rainbow made her new home, a 96 square foot tiny house she decorated with bold colors and glittering floors, she found herself writing song after song. They echo the gentle exuberance, the quiet confidence Rainbow found there.

The dulcimer inspired a new approach to songwriting for Rainbow. “A friend asked if I had ever played one, and when I said no, she immediately taught me to play ‘Boil Them Cabbage,’ and lent me the dulcimer off her lap.”

Rainbow developed her own playing method for nine months, composing songs while learning traditional tunes from songbooks, even creating the first-ever dulcimer cover of Taylor Swift’s “Trouble.” “The dulcimer is an extraordinarily quiet instrument because it was invented by women who were taught to be seen and not heard,” reflects Rainbow. The flicker of strings provides the perfect counterpoint to Rainbow’s ethereal voice, bringing a hint of mystery to songs like “Ophiuchus” and “Aquarius.”

To deepen her knowledge of the instrument, she turned to fellow Berean and Appalachian folk singer-songwriter Sam Gleaves for dulcimer lessons. She came to know the music of the late Jean Ritchie, a dulcimer player and folk legend based just a few miles from The Palace, whose music inspired “No Shoes.”

Rainbow’s arrangements and original songs feel deeply rooted in the hills and valleys of Kentucky, like the delicate yet powerful “Amazing Grace.” Some feel intimately connected to the beauty of the birds, the woods, the plants and flowers, like “Little Bird,” reminiscent of the otherworldly sweetness of Vashti Bunyan. And some chronicle the joys of the community she loves deeply. “I’ve lived in Europe. I’ve traveled plenty,” she reflects. “But there’s no place like home.”

A long-standing but unsung cornerstone of the Other South, the creative, progressive and uproarious one, Berea has harbored some of America’s best artists, musicians and craftspeople. This community united to support Rainbow’s efforts as she took her first collection of songs to the studio. A friend lent their geodesic dome-shaped home on Pine Valley Drive, where Rainbow grew up, as an impromptu recording studio. Pine Valley Drive is the street her father named, and is paid homage to on the record. A childhood neighbor came by with homemade goodies to share. And a crowd of friends came to back Rainbow on the chorus of “Berea,” the first single from the album.

Rainbow’s gift is conveying the moment with keen immediacy, that sense of place and presence of mind. “Most of my songs exist because I have the most gracious muses in the world,” Rainbow smiles. “About everytime I pick up an instrument, a song falls from the sky, and it feels like my duty to catch it and share it with the world.”

 

Event
08/17/2018